Archives for posts with tag: fasting

So you’re not hungry in the morning and you don’t want to eat breakfast?

Nurse Angry says you’re in good company. Whoever started (and is still perpetuatuating) the myth that everyone has to eat breakfast  should be given 50 lashes with the proverbial wet noodle (they can eat it afterwards if they want) and a lesson in modern physiology and nutrition. Nurse Angry is no friend of breakfast and doesn’t eat it most of the time these days. That gives her an extra 45 minutes of sleep on workdays, and though it was (mostly) pleasant to sit with the family in the morning, she doesn’t have to pretend to enjoy her oatmeal anymore. Not eating breakfast even saves money and you don’t have to carry stuff you don’t eat home from the store, either.  What a great way to “fast”- if you’re not hungry, don’t eat!

A randomized controlled trial to study the effects of breakfast on energy intake, physical activity, and body fat in women who are nonhabitual breakfast eaters

If Nurse Angry should happen to be hungry at breakfast time, she eats. If hunger strikes at work, she eats nuts if she has any, otherwise she just waits until lunchtime.

This not eating breakfast thing is relatively new for Nurse Angry. She is a big fan of Dr Jason Fung and now thinks fasting is a great idea for allowing your insulin levels to go down and  letting your body do other stuff instead of digesting food. Digestion is time and energy consuming for your poor little body. So keep that in mind if you’re sick and really un-hungry but there’s someone telling you that you “have to eat”. Ignore them.

Somewhere along the way we got the idea that being hungry was a dangerous state.  And maybe it was, long ago when most of us didn’t have three or four 7Elevens within walking distance.  One situation many people might recognize as slightly horrifying is when they are not be able to provide their child (or worse, somebody else’s child) with a snack the minute said child was hungry.  Don’t starve the children!

Nurse Angry read a weight loss tip recently in a women’s magazine. It was to never allow yourself to get hungry between meals, because that’s when you might eat something you’ll regret.  Nurse Angry begs her readers to reflect upon the wisdom of this strategy.

She would instead recommend making friends with real feelings of hunger and eating when hungry, making sure to eat enough fat and protein for good nutritional value and a feeling of actual satiation and satiety that will last until the next meal.  Nurse Angry has personal experience of this and she much prefers the relationship she now has with food.

Breakfast is the meal where it’s easiest to load up on carbs (especially in the form of sugar). So take a look at what you’re giving to the kids, and maybe adults giving breakfast a miss if not hungry  isn’t such a stupid idea after all.

All that being said, Nurse Angry does love a nice bowl of steel-cut oats, just not in the early morning, please.

Nurse Angry’s recommended Saturday reading. She loves dr Jason Fung and Marty Kendall’s blog is always worth reading.

optimising nutrition

Considering the massive amount of research and interest in the idea of fasting, not a lot has been written for the general population on the topic.

Brad Pilon’s 2009 e-book Eat Stop Eat was a great, though fairly concise, resource on the mechanisms and benefits of fasting.

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Martin Berkhan’s LeanGains blog had a cult following for a while in the bodybuilding community.

image17Michael Mosley’s 2012 documentary Eat, Fast and Live Longer documentary piqued the public interest and was followed by the popular 5:2 Diet book.

Then in 2013, Jason Fung emerged onto the low carb scene with his epic six part Aetiology of Obesity YouTube Series in which he detailed a wide range of theories relating to obesity and diabetes.

Essentially, Jason’s key points are that:

  • simply treating Type 2 diabetes with more insulin to suppress blood glucose levels while continuing to eat the diet that caused the diabetes…

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